Work Experience

  • Todate 2017

    Lecturer

    Near East University, Clinical Pharmacy

  • 2016 2014

    Assistant lecturer

    Near East University, clinical pharmacy

Education & Training

  • Ph.D. 2017

    Clinical Pharmacy

    Near East University

  • Master2014

    Clinical Pharmacy

    Near East University

  • Bachelor2012

    Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD)

    Jordan University of Science and Technology

Honors, Awards and Grants

Research Projects

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Conference Paper -, Volume -, Issue -, 2014, Pages -

Abstract

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Özet

A. M. Abdi ,F. Rasmussen, R. Demirdamar, "Introducing Clinical Pharmacy Services: Efficacy in a Respiratory Diseases Clinic and Physicians Perceptions toward the Services at a University Hospital in Northern Cyprus". Int J Clin Pharm, DOI10.1007/s11096-014-0039-2,12 Dec 2014

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Conference Paper -, Volume -, Issue -, 2015, Pages -

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Özet

Mentoring clinical competent graduates for delivering pharmaceutical care .(5th oncology pharmacists association conference Istanbul-turkey 2015 (invited speaker)

Pharmacist's responsibilities in a patient centered healthcare system

Conference Paper FIP Congress in Buenos Aires (Argentina)2016, Volume -, Issue -, 2016, Pages -

Abstract

"A more responsible approach of pharmaceutical care practice" was what Hepler and Strand called for and since then pharmacy practice continued to evolve to a more patient centered practice , a practice that clearly emphasis on patient‘s welfare.[1] Pharmacists for the last three decades kept introducing and evaluating hundreds of new and existing services or interventions useing a range of research methodologies and medication-administration modalities, to contribute to the field of patient safety and achieve better therapeutic outcomes. Currently people live longer; thanks to advances in understanding of the causes of diseases, and consequent improvements in diagnostic techniques and effective treatment modalities. However, not only are people living longer, but increasingly people are living longer with chronic diseases, which form at the end nine out of ten top causes of death worldwide.[2] This means the presence of the same reasons that brought out the revolution in global healthcare in the last century and also brought the shift in pharmacy practice i.e. illness and drug related morbidity and mortality, whether in terms of efficacy or adverse effects. this necessitate all healthcare providers to be dedicated for collaborating to integrate evidence-based practices that not just improve the use of medicines; but also aid in prevention and early detection of diseases and provide sustainable care for vulnerable patients by engaging effectively with them.[3][5] Being the most accessible health care professional, community pharmacists have a crucial role in helping to ensure patients receive treatment at an earlier stage by profesionally screening and carrying simple diagnostic tests that may lead to better therapy outcome, while increasing evidence recommend community pharmacies as a feasible setting in which to deliver health promotion-type interventions and thus actively contribute to public health.[3][4] A Solid grounding in evidence-based practice and literature critique is necessary for adopting such new interventions and also for carrying medication management duties as clinical evidence grows exponentially.[6] All mentioned, goes with the "responsibility" fathers of modern pharmacy practice called for in their famous paper "Opportunities and Responsibilities in Pharmaceutical Care” more than 30 years ago and today’s 7 stars pharmacists are committed for; a patient centered pharmacy practice.


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Conference Paper -, Volume -, Issue -, 2016, Pages -

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Introducing Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) into Pharmacy Curriculum for Students of Northern Cyprus.(FIP Düsseldorf 2015 oral presentation; article under review for publication(1 author)).

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Original Article -, Volume -, Issue -, 2015, Pages -

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Özet

Introducing clinical pharmacy services: pharmaceutical care services provided for cardiovascular diseases patients using PCNE DRP classification tool V6.2 at a tertiary hospital in northern Cyprus. (FIP 2015 poster presentation (presenter & author) )

Introducing Clinical Pharmacy Services: Efficacy in a Respiratory Diseases Clinic and Physicians Perceptions toward the Service at NEU Hospital in Northern Cyprus

Original Article International Journal Of Clinical Pharmacy, Volume 37, Issue 1, 2015, Pages 230-231

Abstract

Background: Clinical pharmacists are a primary source of scientifically valid information and advice regarding the safe, appropriate, and cost-effective use of medications having wide scope in drug Information and utilization, After the introduction of the new concepts of clinical pharmacy and pharmaceutical care which are quite different than the traditional practice of dispensing or marketing (medical representatives) that influenced the physician's pharmacist relations for the last decades, it will be necessary to evaluate efficacy of ward based services and how physicians will percept and interact with the new practice which is thought to be the dominant pharmacy practice in the few coming years. Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce and evaluate ward based clinical pharmacy services (CPS) in a Respiratory Diseases (RD) clinic of Near East University Hospital in Turkish Republic of North Cyprus (TRNC) and assess its efficacy and physician's perceptions toward the services. Methods: The Study was carried out in the RD clinic from DEC 2013 till FEB 2014, the study was a prospective interventional study introducing CPS's and documenting it over the study period. A questionnaire investigating physicians' perceptions and attitude was also delivered to all internal medicine physicians' including RD physicians on baseline. After the end of the study physician's experience was also evaluated Interventions were recorded and later evaluated by an independent clinical committee for their feasibility and effect on patients. Results: 82.35% of the targeted physicians sample have responded to baseline survey,( n=17) majority (92%) did not had any previous interaction with clinical pharmacists ,they generally well perceived and had high expectations to pharmaceutical care services in general, sampled group reported to be most comfortable with activities such as monitoring outcomes of pharmacotherapeutic regimens (64.3% fully comfortable) involving in designing and monitoring pharmacotherapeutic regimens, detecting and preventing prescription errors (64.3% fully comfortable) and providing patient education (57.1% comfortable, 28.6 % moderately comfortable ) respectively, while regarding pharmacists in general as eligible drug experts(93%). This was even more improved in the group who experienced CPS's after that. In implementing CPS, 118 interventions were done, 86.6% accepted and regarded as clinically relevant. Interventions mostly related to cardiovascular agents. Add/ change/stop medications were the most common type of interventions (21%). Most common resultant outcome was to avoid adverse effects or toxicities. Intervention were significantly related to number of drugs used(r= 0,487; p=0,006), rate of acceptance significantly was higher to services compared to interventions (p<0.005). But not significantly higher in drugs related to other specialties (p=0.418). Conclusion: A clinical pharmacist was recognized as an expert in the therapeutic use of medications, providing a unique set of knowledge and skills to the health care system. The introduction of CPS's with-in the healthcare team lead to clinically relevant and highly accepted optimization of medicine use in different wards and clinics including RD clinic in the case of this study, it was relatively well perceived by physicians in TRNC, but also could be more valued if more optimized and practiced by talented proactive clinical pharmacists in ward-based manner. a practice which should be generalized to all health care settings in Turkey and TRNC to achieve rational drug use.


Özet

Introducing a clinical pharmacy practice experience into pharmacy education curriculum for students of Turkey and Northern Cyprus

Original Article INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACY , Volume 39, Issue 1, 2017, Pages 254-255

Abstract

Background and Objective: Despite the global advances of pharmacy practice and subsequently pharmacy education, students experience insufficient opportunities to practice the activities, tasks and processes essential to deliver pharmaceutical care. Objective: to describe the development, implementation, and assessment of a clinical pharmacy practice (CPP) experience course in internal medicine, cardiovascular, respiratory clinics and drug information center that is newly integrated into pharmacy curriculum at a university in North Cyprus. Setting and Method: A 8 weeks structured pharmacy practice experience was designed for fifth year students. Student competence was assessed using formative OSCEs and summative written exams before and after the course, and mapped in 8 main CPP competences. The course utilized a wide variety of Learning and practical activities including rounds participation, morning case reports, interdiciplanary activities, carrying interventions, role-play, direct patient care, Formal case presentations, journal clubs and answering drug queries. Competencies tested and strengthened include: taking medication history, response to the symptoms, pharmacotherapy knowledge application, comprehensive patient assessment, data interpretation using evidence-based approach, public health counseling, drug related problems management, patient counseling and communication skills. Student perceptions and experience was assessed using semi-structured group interview and a questionnaire. Main outcome measures: Student scores in OSCE ; student's perceptions Results: student reported that the course met preset objectives with substantial learning in different areas of CPP. Students scored best in communication skills (83,4 ±1,74%), public health promotion (76.6±2,32%) and patient counseling (68,0±2,74 %) than in resolution of DRPs (49,0±4,33%) and pharmacotherapy application (49,0±3,37%), while they significantly enhanced in DI manipulation (88.1 ± 2,6%) compared to baseline assessment (33.1±2,41%). Conclusion: The course provided a rich experiential learning environment rather than just theoretical knowledge of clinical pharmacy. Students well precieved the course structure assessment and knowledge attained.This could be implemented in other faculties of pharmacy throught Turkey.


Özet

Introducing a performance-based objective clinical examination into the pharmacy curriculum for students of Northern Cyprus

Original Article Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, Volume 3, Issue 16, 2017, Pages 681-688

Abstract

Purpose: To describe how a formative Objective Structured Clinical Examination was applied to fourth year pharmacy students at a university in Northern Cyprus. Methods: A blueprint-guided performance-based objective clinical examination was implemented. Group-prepared case scenarios based on course objectives were used to develop 12 exam stations. Scenarios were discussed in common training sessions for both assessors (faculty members) and senior students (standardized patients). Pilot testing of all stations was carried out on the day of the examination. Competencies tested included medical history taking, pharmacotherapeutic knowledge application, systemic client assessment, evidence-based drug information (DI) manipulation, drug related problems (DRP) management, patient counseling and communication skills. Results: The exam revealed that students were better in performing patient counseling (4.4 ± 0.23) and identification/resolution of DRPs (3.68 ± 0.18) than in DI tasks (2.00 ± 0.21) (p < 0.05). The students’ perceptions were positive with no significant differences in their average general performance compared to a written exam that had been previously carried out (p = 1.0). Conclusion: The evaluation revealed that undergraduate pharmacy students in a Turkish school of pharmacy were better in performing patient counseling and identification/ resolution of DRPs than in drug information manipulation tasks. Student satisfaction with OSCEs was higher compared to the written examination. The design and implementation of the formative assessment was successful with minimum cost, using only the existing available space and personnel.


Özet

An Evidence-Based Review of Pain Management in Acute Myocardial Infarction

Review Journal of Cardiology & Clinical Research, Volume 4, Issue 4, 2016, Pages 1067

Abstract

Since the turn of the twentieth century, morphine, an opioid analgesic, has played an integral role in the management of pain in myocardial infarction (MI). This is attributed to morphine’s effect on reducing blood pressure, slowing heart rate, and relieving anxiety, which may decrease myocardial oxygen demand, added to the fact that morphine has been studied extensively in pain management in many settings. For this morphine kept considered amongst the first line therapies and most effective for acute pain management in MI patients according to many guidelines. However, observational data suggest that morphine administration during acute myocardial infarction (AMI) may have negative consequences, while this practice also lacks supporting rigorous evidence or studies designed to assess the effect of morphine administration. Added to this recent evidence uncovered that morphine may impede gastrointestinal absorption of oral antiplatelet drugs important in reducing mortality in AMI. These observations permit a comprehensive evaluation of the rationality of administration of morphine in AMI, and whether better alternatives are available in currently used analgesics or by using a morphine non-interacting P2Y12 receptor inhibitor for AMI patients. In this review we discuss the rationality of morphine use according to recent evidence and the side effects and drug-drug interactions of morphine affecting MI patient with the present alternatives based on the findings of experimental, observational and randomized clinical studies.


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Currrent Teaching

  • 2018 GÜZ

    CLINICAL PHARMACY APPLICATIONS

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  • 2018 GÜZ

    GRADUATION PROJECT

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  • 2018 GÜZ

    SEMINAR

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  • 2018 GÜZ

    MASTER THESIS

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Teaching History

  • 2017 GÜZ

    SEMINAR

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  • 2016 BAHAR

    REQUIRED CLINICAL ROTATION III

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  • 2017 YAZ

    MASTER THESIS

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    Literature Reading and Scientific Project Organization

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  • 2016 BAHAR

    Literature Reading and Scientific Project Organization

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    CASE ANALYSIS - II

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  • 2017 GÜZ

    GRADUATION PROJECT

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  • 2017 GÜZ

    REQUIRED CLINICAL ROTATION- II

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    ADVANCED THERAPEUTİCS

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  • 2017 GÜZ

    CLINICAL PHARMACY APPLICATION - I

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  • 2016 BAHAR

    CASE ANALYSIS - I

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  • 2016 BAHAR

    PHARMACEUTICAL CARE

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    PHARMACEUTICAL CARE

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    SEMINAR

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  • 2016 BAHAR

    CLINICAL PHARMACY APPLICATION - I

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  • 2017 BAHAR

    CLINICAL PHARMACY APPLICATION - I

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At My Office

Email: abdikarim.abdi@neu.edu.tr. Phone: 00905428799433 ; Whatsapp, Viber, Line, Skype. Near East University ; Faculty of Pharmacy Near East University Hospital ; Drug information center.